How Do You Keep Fence Posts From Rotting In Concrete?

How long will wooden posts last in concrete?

Reason being that the old chromated copper arsenate (CCA) wood treatment was banned in 2004 and modern treatments are no where near as good.

Life expectancy of posts now is anywhere from 18 months to 5-7 years max..

Should I use concrete for fence posts?

Concrete is the most secure material for setting fence posts, especially if you have sandy soil. Gravel may be okay with dense, clay-heavy soil, but in looser soil, concrete is the only thing that will truly keep your fence posts stuck in place.

What should you do when you find timber infected with rot?

Wet Rot Treatment To solve issues with wet rot, it is important to first identify the source of moisture and stop the cause of the damp. Alternatively, you can isolate the timber from the damp source before treating the affected areas. In some extreme cases you will need to replace the affected timbers.

How long do fence posts last in concrete?

Supreme Concrete’s Strongcast slotted concrete fence posts, on the other hand, have a typical life expectancy of twenty-five years or more, and will continue to provide support for expensive fence panels whatever the weather.

Will fence posts rot in concrete?

Simply setting the posts in concrete does create a condition that will accelerate rot in the bottom of the posts. With pressure-treated posts, the rot will be slow. … First, the posts should be set on top of a bed of coarse gravel 3 to 6 inches deep, so the base of the post is in contact with the gravel.

How long will a treated 4×4 post last in the ground?

The Forest Products Laboratory and other research groups have shown that treated wood stakes placed in the ground for more than 40 years remain rot-free. But young pressure-treated decks, many less than 10 years old, are being shoveled into landfills.

How long will a 6×6 post last in concrete?

40 yearsThe treated post that are rated for ground contact are guaranteed for 40 years.

What causes fence posts to rot?

Fence posts rot where the post exits the soil. … of soil contains millions of microbes. The soil builds up around the base of the post and acts like a sponge to retain moisture. The moisture and soil is fuel for fungi and the oxygen fuels the rot.

Is 2 feet deep enough for fence posts?

The minimum depth that you should dig your fence post holes for panel sections is 2 feet. A general formula is to dig the holes one-third to one-half of the post’s aboveground height. The deeper you dig the holes, the more stability your fence has, but you must also purchase longer posts.

How many bags of concrete do I need for a fence post?

Mix two 50lb bags of concrete with water in a mixing tub or 5-gallon bucket. Add concrete into the hole and around the 4” x 4”. Depending on your climate, let concrete set up for 24 – 48 hours.

Why deck posts should not be set in concrete?

When concrete is poured around a deck post in this way, the post will rot due to moisture buildup by the soil. … Concrete tends to absorb moisture and wood expands when it gets wet, so these two factors combined will result in the wood breaking the concrete.

Do pressure treated posts rot in concrete?

Pressure-treated wood will rot in concrete when exposed to wet conditions such as trapped water. In optimal conditions, pressure-treated wood set in the earth may last as long as 40 years. However, when vertically set in a non-draining concrete base, pressure-treated wood may last only a few years.

What should I put between wood and concrete?

In most cases, either pressure-treated lumber or naturally durable lumber (defined by the IRC as the heartwood of redwood, cedar, black locust, and black walnut) is acceptable. In some cases, separating wood from concrete with a water-impervious membrane or vapor retarder is all that’s required.

How long will a 4×4 post last in concrete?

about 20 yearsOriginally Answered: How long will 4×4 post last in the ground? A pressure treated 4×4 set in concrete should last about 20 years of more, depending on the soil conditions and drainage.

What do you treat fence posts with?

Treat the Post With Preservatives Soak the bottom of the posts in a wood preservative containing copper napthanate, such as Cuprinol. Note: Available at some paint stores and home centers, this wood treatment is specifically designed for in-ground applications.

How long will pressure treated posts last in concrete?

5 to 10 years5 Answers. A PT post will last a long time in concrete, maybe 5 to 10 years in soil alone. I suggest you embed the post in concrete, trowel a peak around the post so water runs off, and don’t let the PT post come in contact with the ground.

How do you keep timber from rotting in the ground?

Purchase a wood preservative that contains copper naphthenate at a lumberyard or hardware store. Pour about 1⁄2 litre (0.53 qt) of it into a large bucket. Set the end of your post that you’ll bury in the ground into the bucket and let it soak for 15–20 minutes.

Will pressure treated wood rot if buried?

Pressure-Treated Wood Makes the Grade Pressure-treated wood in contact with the ground needs the most protection, and will rot in just a few years if you use the wrong grade. … If your wood will touch the ground or be buried, you should get the highest grade you can, up to .

How long do pressure treated fence posts last?

A properly pressure treated pine fence posts, for example, can exist for a range of 20–35 years if well installed while the untreated one only lasts between 3–7 years.

Can pressure treated wood go directly on concrete?

YES. Any exterior concrete that is in contact with earth may wick moisture. Thus, it is required to place pressure treated wood directly against the concrete if one wishes next to build off that concrete with untreated wood.

Does wood rot in concrete?

When wood is kept in direct contact with concrete, the moisture in the concrete will be drawn up into the wood, and after a period of time the wood will rot. … when concrete is freshly placed it begins its drying process. when wood is in contact with the concrete, the concrete leaches out its water into the wood.